Tag Archives: microbiome

The microbiome in autoinflammatory diseases: a missing link?

We are not alone.  Right now, there are over 500 species of bacteria living in your mouth.  Each part of your gut (stomach, small intestine, large intestine) provides a home to 1000 unique bacterial species.  There are many more bacteria living on your skin and in every orifice in your body.  Microbes make up (at least half of) who we are.  We are a walking ecosystem with an incredible diversity of organisms unique to us, and in more ways than one, they make up who we are and what we do. Continue reading The microbiome in autoinflammatory diseases: a missing link?

Kawasaki Disease And The End Of Rheumatology As We Know It

This week, an international research team led by Xavier Rodó published a fascinating study in PNAS suggesting that Kawasaki disease is caused by an agent transported by wind from farms in Northeast China.  This agent, possibly a fungal toxin, would be responsible for triggering an exuberant immune response in children, causing the typical manifestation of the disease: fevers, rash, conjunctivitis, “strawberry tongue,” enlarged lymph nodes, and swelling of the extremities.  Untreated, Kawasaki disease can cause aneurysms of the coronary arteries, premature heart disease, and even death. Continue reading Kawasaki Disease And The End Of Rheumatology As We Know It