Tag Archives: Medical education

This is how I write science papers

Growing up in Venezuela, I really wanted to be a writer. I loved writing short stories with fictional characters named Petunia who overcame challenges and provided a moral in the end. I remember writing one story in which one of the characters tragically dies. My mom (a psychotherapist) thought it reflected a hidden trauma and sent me to one of her colleagues for evaluation. Fortunately, the therapist concluded (correctly, if I may add) that I was just being creative.

At the time, it never crossed my mind to become a doctor. This sentiment persisted through adolescence; when discussing my future in my college application essay, I stated: “I do not want to become a doctor or a lawyer.” And yet they still accepted me! Continue reading This is how I write science papers

Mastering the Inpatient Consult Service

Every few months I have the pleasure of teaming up with one of my fellows (and often a resident, and sometimes a medical student), to evaluate hospitalized patients with known or suspected rheumatic diseases as part of the inpatient consult service. This is quite a change from my typical day as a rheumatologist, where I see patients in an outpatient clinic.

On occasion, patients with known rheumatic diseases land in the hospital—the patient with lupus and worsening kidney disease, the patient with gout and a severe flare, the patient with vasculitis experiencing a relapse. At the same time, many patients are admitted for workup of unexplained symptoms—joint pain, fevers, rash—or develop these while being treated other conditions. For these patients, we are asked to evaluate for the presence of rheumatic diseases.

Having just finished covering the inpatient rheumatology consult service, I am reflecting on my week and have identified 15 factors that help you achieve a successful week. Continue reading Mastering the Inpatient Consult Service

How I use social media for medical education (and why you should, too!)

Social media is a great tool for medical educators, but, like anything else worth doing, it takes some effort to get started. Social media allows you to teach, learn, collaborate, research, socialize, produce scholarship, and advance your career.  Here’s how I’ve used social media over the past two years, and why you may want to dive in as well.

Continue reading How I use social media for medical education (and why you should, too!)